COVID-19 UPDATE: The Law Offices of Evan M. Rosen remains open to help clients defend against foreclosure, fight improper debt collection, and seek justice for their injuries. We are working remotely and can be reached by phone, e-mail, chat, contact form, and video conference. Click here for the latest updates on how COVID-19 is impacting the law.

AV Preeminent 2020
Florida Legal Elite
AVVO
Super Lawyers
NITA
NACA

Articles Posted in Consumer Protection

Many companies are breaking the law and you could be entitled to recover money when they do.

According to a body of federal law designed to protect consumers, lenders, and our entire banking system, a printed credit or debit card receipt provided at the point of sale/transaction cannot show any portion of the expiration date of your card nor can it show more than the last five digits of your card number. This includes ATM receipts. But it does not apply to handwritten or e-mailed receipts, nor does it apply to those that contain an imprint or copy of the actual card.

If you don’t keep receipts, please start paying attention to any receipt provided to you at the point of sale/transaction and let us know if you find one that violates the law.

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act or “CARES Act” became law on March 27, 2020. Out of 335 pages, just over one page pertains to owners of single-family homes, townhouses, and condos. About a page and a half pertains to people who own and rent multi-family investment properties. And, there is about a page and a half on evictions. The great majority of the Act addresses unemployment, medical issues, and appropriation of funds to various government agencies. There is also a sizable section on $500,000,000,000 in loans, guarantees, and investments that the Treasury Secretary gets to dole out.

I’ve posted the applicable sections below but first, here is my summary of the key points for homeowners and tenants:

  • All of the protections apply only to properties that have “Federally backed mortgage loans.”

In addition to running Westlaw.com, a premier legal research service, Thompson Reuters also publishes Super Lawyers. As stated on SuperLawyers.com:

Super Lawyers is a rating service of outstanding lawyers from more than 70 practice areas who have attained a high-degree of peer recognition and professional achievement. The patented selection process includes independent research, peer nominations and peer evaluations.

Super Lawyers Magazine features the list and profiles of selected attorneys and is distributed to attorneys in the state or region and the ABA-accredited law school libraries. Super Lawyers is also published as a special section in leading city and regional magazines across the country. Lawyers are selected to a Super Lawyers list in all 50 states and Washington, D.C.

On or about March 13, 2009, our client, Mr. Julian Garvin, was called to active duty by the United States Army for one year, to begin on March 22, 2009. On March 26, 2009, he informed his mortgage servicer, JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., that he had been called to serve. Mr. Garvin provided a copy of his deployment order and asked them to reduce his interest rate, as required by federal law. No such adjustments were made. While on active duty, and for 11 months after his return, Mr. Garvin continued to make his full monthly payments. Then, at the peak of the crisis, he was unable to continue to pay.

On November 14, 2012, ALS-RVC, LLC, the entity claiming the right to foreclose, filed suit. The case went to trial and was involuntary dismissed, in part, because of ALS-RVC’s failure to adjust the interest rate as required by the Servicemember Civil Relief Act (SCRA). 50 U.S.C.A §3937. ALS-RVC appeals. In their Initial brief they concede the SCRA “applies to this situation, and [Mr. Garvin’s] loan payments should have been credited with a reduced interest rate during his active duty…” They also concede that “Subsection (e) of 527 is entitled ‘Penalty’ and reads, ‘Whoever knowingly violates subsection (a) shall be fined as provided in title 18, United States Code, imprisoned for not more than one year, or both.’ 50 U.S.C.A § 3937(e).” Yet, rather than trying to make amends for their admitted, jailable offense committed against a member of the United States Army, the bank and their lawyers appeal.

In the 80s, we were introduced to the phrase “trickle down economics.” From what I see in this and so many other cases, the only thing trickling down from Wall Street is fraud, greed, arrogance and a complete disregard for the rule of law.

Contact Information